Credits: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

These raw, unprocessed images of Saturn’s tiny moon, Pan, were taken on March 7, 2017, by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft. The flyby had a close-approach distance of 24,572 kilometers (15,268 miles). According to Cassini imaging lead Carolyn Porco, the little moon has a bulging equatorial ridge that was likely caused by ring material accreted onto Pan after its formation. Another of Saturn’s moons, named Atlas, exhibits a similar equatorial bulge.

Source: NASA

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About aritter2014

I am a Librarian. To be honest, I wouldn't want to do anything else. I have a strong background in architecture, computer technology, English literature, Internet applications, web site design, film studies and modern art. I would like to use this page to express my personal musings and experiences on news, pop culture, nature, art, science, technology and what ever becomes a curiosity.

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